Bread

How To Make Sourdough Starter from Scratch

Making your own sourdough starter from scratch is very easy and it calls for simple ingredients like whole wheat flour, white flour and water. And all you have to do is to stir together some flours and water and let it sit in a warmish place.

This sourdough starter, also known as wild yeast, it is used instead of commercial yeast to make bread and other baked goods. Wild yeast works much more slowly to proof breads and it calls for extra time and attention because you have to feed your baby 🙂 But it totally worth the effort because the bread made with wild east has a great texture, it’s very tasty and healthier than the bread made with commercial yeast.

How to grow a sourdough starter

Wild yeast is present in all types of flour. By combining flour and water and letting sit for a few days in a warmish place we actually cultivate the wild yeast. Gradually you’ll see that your starter becomes active, you can see small bubbles. If you feed the starter with fresh water and flour it will be more and more active.

After 6-7 days it should double the volume in about 8 hours and this is the moment to make your first bread using this sourdough starter. Every starter is unique and it may take up to 10 days to get a strong starter. For instance, mine was ready in 8 days but it wasn’t strong enough. So, for the best results, I recommend you to continue to feed the starter and bake the first bread in the 10th day.

You should also try:

No knead homemade bread

Homemade potato bread

Easy flatbread (no yeast)

Ham and cheese stuffed pita bread

Feta cheese and onion bagels

Ingredients

– whole wheat flour

– white flour

– water – room temperature

You also need:

– an electronic kitchen scale

– a clean bowl or a jar

How to make sourdough starter

Day 1 – Make the initial starter

Morning

Use a bowl or a jar to combine 100 gr (1/3 cup 1 tablespoon and 1 teaspoon) room temperature water, 50 gr (1/2 cup minus 2 tablespoons) whole wheat flour and 50 gr (1/2 cup minus 1 tablespoon) white flour.

Then loosely cover the bowl an let sit at room temperature (in a warmish place would be better) for 24 hours

Day 2: Feed the Starter


You may see a few small bubbles on top. But if you don’t see any bubbles yet, don’t panic, your starter might be slower. Anyway, you should continue to feed your starter.

Morning

Transfer to a clean bowl 75 gr (2.64 oz) from the initial starter. Discard the rest of it.
Add 75 gr (1/3 cup minus 1 teaspoon) room temperature water, 25 gr (3 tablespoons) whole wheat flour and 50 gr (1/2 cup minus 1 tablespoon) white flour. Stir.

Then loosely cover the bowl an let sit at room temperature (in a warmish place would be better) for 12 hours

Evening

Repeat: Transfer to a clean bowl 75 gr (2.64 oz) from the initial starter. Discard the rest of it.Add 75 gr (1/3 cup minus 1 teaspoon) room temperature water, 25 gr (3 tablespoons) whole wheat flour and 50 gr (1/2 cup minus 1 tablespoon) white flour. Stir.

Then loosely cover the bowl an let sit at room temperature (in a warmish place would be better) for 12 hours

Day 3: Feed the Starter

Morning

Transfer to a clean bowl 75 gr (2.64 oz) from the initial starter. Discard the rest of it.
Add 75 gr (1/3 cup minus 1 teaspoon) room temperature water, 25 gr (3 tablespoons) whole wheat flour and 50 gr (1/2 cup minus 1 tablespoon) white flour. Stir.

Then loosely cover the bowl an let sit at room temperature (in a warmish place would be better) for 12 hours

Evening

Repeat: Transfer to a clean bowl 75 gr (2.64 oz) from the initial starter. Discard the rest of it. Add 75 gr (1/3 cup minus 1 teaspoon) room temperature water, 25 gr (3 tablespoons) whole wheat flour and 50 gr (1/2 cup minus 1 tablespoon) white flour. Stir.

Then loosely cover the bowl an let sit at room temperature (in a warmish place would be better) for 12 hours

Day 4 and 5

Repeat the instructions from day 2 (morning and evening)

Your starter should be looking more and more bubbly

Day 6 and 7

Your starter is more and more active. It should be able to double in size in 12 hours. It smells better, sourish, like yogurt

Continue to feed the starter once at 24 hours

Morning

Transfer to a clean bowl 75 gr (2.64 oz) from the initial starter. Discard the rest of it.

Add 75 gr (1/3 cup minus 1 teaspoon) room temperature water, 25 gr (3 tablespoons) whole wheat flour and 50 gr (1/2 cup minus 1 tablespoon) white flour. Stir.

Then loosely cover the bowl an let sit at room temperature (in a warmish place would be better) for 24 hours

After 6-7 days your starter should be able to double in size in about 8 hours. But it depends on multiple factors like the flour and water quality and room temperature and each starter is unique.

From this moment you can use your starter to bake the first bread. But for the best results I recommend you though to continue to feed the starter at 24 hours and bake the first bread in the 10th day.

How to use the sourdough starter to make a bread

After feeding, the starter has growing stage. It takes about 5 to 8 hours to double the volume. After that your starter will reduce the volume. You should use your starter at it’s maximum volume.

If you don’t bake daily, keep your starter into the fridge. Feed your starter, wait until double in size then refrigerate it. Feed your starter once a week.

Enjoy!
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